OUR STORY

OUR STORY

In May 2003, at the age of 15, James and Rob were on the train home from a cycle tour of the Lake District in North-West England

In May 2003, at the age of 15, James and Rob were on the train home from a cycle tour of the Lake District in North-West England

In May 2003, at the age of 15, James and Rob were on the train home from a cycle tour of the Lake District in North-West England

In May 2003, at the age of 15, James and Rob were on the train home from a cycle tour of the Lake District in North-West England

in which they had proudly ascended two of the country’s hardest passes Hardknott and Wrynose. They came across a newspaper article about the 50th Anniversary of the first ascent of Mt. Everest, and in that instant brimming with naïve confidence, they were captivated by a panoramic photo of icy Himalayan peaks. Below in bold letters were the statistivs of how few people had reached it’s summit, and how many had died trying. From that moment they were hooked. 

"Could we become the youngest people to climb Mount Everest?” "Lets find out."

So they went home and started researching.

in which they had proudly ascended two of the country’s hardest passes Hardknott and Wrynose. They came across a newspaper article about the 50th Anniversary of the first ascent of Mt. Everest, and in that instant brimming with naïve confidence, they were captivated by a panoramic photo of icy Himalayan peaks. Below in bold letters were the statistivs of how few people had reached it’s summit, and how many had died trying. From that moment they were hooked. 

"Could we become the youngest people to climb Mount Everest?” "Lets find out."

So they went home and started researching.

in which they had proudly ascended two of the country’s hardest passes Hardknott and Wrynose. They came across a newspaper article about the 50th Anniversary of the first ascent of Mt. Everest, and in that instant brimming with naïve confidence, they were captivated by a panoramic photo of icy Himalayan peaks. Below in bold letters were the statistivs of how few people had reached it’s summit, and how many had died trying. From that moment they were hooked. 

"Could we become the youngest people to climb Mount Everest?” "Lets find out."

So they went home and started researching.

in which they had proudly ascended two of the country’s hardest passes Hardknott and Wrynose. They came across a newspaper article about the 50th Anniversary of the first ascent of Mt. Everest, and in that instant brimming with naïve confidence, they were captivated by a panoramic photo of icy Himalayan peaks. Below in bold letters were the statistics of how few people had reached its summit, and how many had died trying. From that moment they were hooked. 

"Could we become the youngest people to climb Mount Everest?” "Let's find out."

So they went home and started researching.

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In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest.

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest.

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest.

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest.

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest. They started by learning how to rock climb, and began going on more challenging adventures to develop their skills. Later in 2003 they cycled through the Norwegian Fjords in winter, and in early 2004 they travelled to the French Alps to learn ice climbing and crevasse rescue techniques on Montblanc's Mer de Glace. A few months later in their school summer holidays they travelled to the Karakorum mountains in northern Pakistan to attempt a 7000 m peak called Spantik. Turned back by snow storms, in 2005 they journeyed to Nepal to climb Ama Dablam, a strikingly beautiful mountain from the summit of which they could clearly see their goal, Mount Everest just across the Khumbu Valley. Just six months later at 7:30am on May 17, 2006 they became the youngest Britons to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

“When you have a big goal you want to achieve it can often feel like a brick wall. You stand at the bottom looking up, overwhelmed by how big it is, each brick providing another reason why you can’t reach the top.

The best way to get to the top of the wall safely is to start a long way away and build a staircase ascending one brick at a time so that each individual step is manageable.”

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest. They started by learning how to rock climb, and began going on more challenging adventures to develop their skills. Later in 2003 they cycled through the Norwegian Fjords in winter, and in early 2004 they travelled to the French Alps to learn ice climbing and crevasse rescue techniques on Montblanc's Mer de Glace. A few months later in their school summer holidays they travelled to the Karakorum mountains in northern Pakistan to attempt a 7000 m peak called Spantik. Turned back by snow storms, in 2005 they journeyed to Nepal to climb Ama Dablam, a strikingly beautiful mountain from the summit of which they could clearly see their goal, Mount Everest just across the Khumbu Valley. Just six months later at 7:30am on May 17, 2006 they became the youngest Britons to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

“When you have a big goal you want to achieve it can often feel like a brick wall. You stand at the bottom looking up, overwhelmed by how big it is, each brick providing another reason why you can’t reach the top.

The best way to get to the top of the wall safely is to start a long way away and build a staircase ascending one brick at a time so that each individual step is manageable.”

In the three years following their adventure in the Lake District, James and Rob began training and preparing to climb Mount Everest. They started by learning how to rock climb, and began going on more challenging adventures to develop their skills. Later in 2003 they cycled through the Norwegian Fjords in winter, and in early 2004 they travelled to the French Alps to learn ice climbing and crevasse rescue techniques on Montblanc's Mer de Glace. A few months later in their school summer holidays they travelled to the Karakorum mountains in northern Pakistan to attempt a 7000 m peak called Spantik. Turned back by snow storms, in 2005 they journeyed to Nepal to climb Ama Dablam, a strikingly beautiful mountain from the summit of which they could clearly see their goal, Mount Everest just across the Khumbu Valley. Just six months later at 7:30am on May 17, 2006 they became the youngest Britons to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

“When you have a big goal you want to achieve it can often feel like a brick wall. You stand at the bottom looking up, overwhelmed by how big it is, each brick providing another reason why you can’t reach the top.

The best way to get to the top of the wall safely is to start a long way away and build a staircase ascending one brick at a time so that each individual step is manageable.”

They started by learning how to rock climb, and began going on more challenging adventures to develop their skills. Later in 2003 they cycled through the Norwegian Fjords in winter, and in early 2004 they travelled to the French Alps to learn ice climbing and crevasse rescue techniques on Montblanc's Mer de Glace. A few months later in their school summer holidays they travelled to the Karakorum mountains in northern Pakistan to attempt a 7000 m peak called Spantik. Turned back by snow storms, in 2005 they journeyed to Nepal to climb Ama Dablam, a strikingly beautiful mountain from the summit of which they could clearly see their goal, Mount Everest just across the Khumbu Valley. Just six months later at 7:30am on May 17, 2006 they became the youngest Britons to reach the summit of Mount Everest.


“When you have a big goal you want to achieve it can often feel like a brick wall. You stand at the bottom looking up, overwhelmed by how big it is, each brick providing another reason why you can’t reach the top.
The best way to get to the top of the wall safely is to start a long way away and build a staircase ascending one brick at a time so that each individual step is manageable.”

In 2007, Hooper and Gauntlett began their next expedition, 180˚ Pole-to-Pole:

In 2007, Hooper and Gauntlett began their next expedition, 180˚ Pole-to-Pole:

In 2007, Hooper and Gauntlett began their next expedition, 180˚ Pole-to-Pole:

In 2007, Hooper and Gauntlett began their next expedition, 180˚ Pole-to-Pole:

a world-first trip from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the South Magnetic Pole (a journey of 26,000 miles (42,000km)) using only human and natural power. Starting north of Greenland in April 2007, they skied, sledded, cycled and sailed until they reach the Magnetic South Pole in April 2008, after 396 days. They were subsequently awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year prize for 2008.

“Don’t be scared of pursuing your dreams, because if you want to do something that means that you’ll put all of your passion and energy into it, and if you do that you cannot fail. If you don’t make it the first time, that is not a failure, it’s an opportunity to learn and prepare for your next attempt.”

a world-first trip from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the South Magnetic Pole (a journey of 26,000 miles (42,000km)) using only human and natural power. Starting north of Greenland in April 2007, they skied, sledded, cycled and sailed until they reach the Magnetic South Pole in April 2008, after 396 days. They were subsequently awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year prize for 2008.

“Don’t be scared of pursuing your dreams, because if you want to do something that means that you’ll put all of your passion and energy into it, and if you do that you cannot fail. If you don’t make it the first time, that is not a failure, it’s an opportunity to learn and prepare for your next attempt.”

a world-first trip from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the South Magnetic Pole (a journey of 26,000 miles (42,000km)) using only human and natural power. Starting north of Greenland in April 2007, they skied, sledded, cycled and sailed until they reach the Magnetic South Pole in April 2008, after 396 days. They were subsequently awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year prize for 2008.

“Don’t be scared of pursuing your dreams, because if you want to do something that means that you’ll put all of your passion and energy into it, and if you do that you cannot fail. If you don’t make it the first time, that is not a failure, it’s an opportunity to learn and prepare for your next attempt.”

In 2007, Hooper and Gauntlett began their next expedition, 180˚ Pole-to-Pole: a world-first trip from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the South Magnetic Pole (a journey of 26,000 miles (42,000km)) using only human and natural power. Starting north of Greenland in April 2007, they skied, sledded, cycled and sailed until they reach the Magnetic South Pole in April 2008, after 396 days. They were subsequently awarded the National Geographic Adventurer of the Year prize for 2008.

“Don’t be scared of pursuing your dreams, because if you want to do something that means that you’ll put all of your passion and energy into it, and if you do that you cannot fail. If you don’t make it the first time, that is not a failure, it’s an opportunity to learn and prepare for your next attempt.”

Rob Gauntlett had the most incredible life but died before his time.

Rob Gauntlett had the most incredible life but died before his time.

Rob Gauntlett had the most incredible life but died before his time.

The adventurer's life was taken away from Rob early. He died in a climbing accident on Mont Blanc in January 2009 along with good friend James Atkinson.

His story of remarkable adventure and endeavor continues to inspire people around the world. He died in January 2009 on Mont Blanc, France, along with our friend James Atkinson - both of them just 21 years of age.

Through One Mile Closer, we aim to share their passion for adventure. We want to encourage everyone to join in and achieve something worthwhile through working together, training hard and preparing well. Coupled with the goal of improving ourselves is the fundraising to support children around the world because we all deserve that chance to make our lives better.

His story of remarkable adventure and endeavor continues to inspire people around the world. He died in January 2009 on Mont Blanc, France, along with our friend James Atkinson - both of them just 21 years of age.

Through One Mile Closer, we aim to share their passion for adventure. We want to encourage everyone to join in and achieve something worthwhile through working together, training hard and preparing well. Coupled with the goal of improving ourselves is the fundraising to support children around the world because we all deserve that chance to make our lives better.

His story of remarkable adventure and endeavor continues to inspire people around the world. He died in January 2009 on Mont Blanc, France, along with our friend James Atkinson - both of them just 21 years of age.

Through One Mile Closer, we aim to share their passion for adventure. We want to encourage everyone to join in and achieve something worthwhile through working together, training hard and preparing well. Coupled with the goal of improving ourselves is the fundraising to support children around the world because we all deserve that chance to make our lives better.

The adventurer's life was taken away from Rob early. He died in a climbing accident on Mont Blanc in January 2009 along with good friend James Atkinson. Family and friends of Rob and James began One Mile Closer to ensure that the boys’ passion for adventure would be shared and inspire others to challenge themselves. Through One Mile Closer we hope to continue to share this passion for adventures, both big and small, encouraging anyone and everyone to participate and achieve something remarkable with support, training and preparation. In addition to sharing adventure, we are committed to improving the educational environment for children around the world through fundraising and donations, believing that we all deserve the opportunity to challenge ourselves.

"What we want from you is to dream. Think about what you want to achieve and trying to get there. Now let's get started."

FOUNDERS

FOUNDERS

James1_수정

Dr. James Hooper

At the age of 15, James set his sights on climbing Mt. Everest. Shortly after his 19th birthday, he was gazing down from the summit at the world below him-his life of adventure was only beginning. After conquering Everest with Rob Gauntlett at the age of 19, the pair completed a journey from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the Magnetic South Pole, including a 5000-mile cycle ride from New York to Punta Arenas at the southern tip of Chile. In 2009, he moved to Korea to study geography at Kyunghee University and subsequently joined the popular panel-show “Non-summit”. James is an accomplished motivational speaker and has been instrumental as a founding member of One Mile Closer in Europe and Korea.

@jameshooper 

Dr. James Hooper FRGS

At the age of 15, James set his sights on climbing Mt. Everest. Shortly after his 19th birthday, he was gazing down from the summit at the world below him-his life of adventure was only beginning. After conquering Everest with Rob Gauntlett at the age of 19, the pair completed a journey from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the Magnetic South Pole, including a 5000-mile cycle ride from New York to Punta Arenas at the southern tip of Chile. In 2009, he moved to Korea to study geography at Kyunghee University and subsequently joined the popular panel-show “Non-summit”. James is an accomplished motivational speaker and has been instrumental as a founding member of One Mile Closer in Europe and Korea.

@jameshooper 

Dr. James Hooper FRGS

At the age of 15, James set his sights on climbing Mt. Everest. Shortly after his 19th birthday, he was gazing down from the summit at the world below him-his life of adventure was only beginning. After conquering Everest with Rob Gauntlett at the age of 19, the pair completed a journey from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the Magnetic South Pole, including a 5000-mile cycle ride from New York to Punta Arenas at the southern tip of Chile. In 2009, he moved to Korea to study geography at Kyunghee University and subsequently joined the popular panel-show “Non-summit”. James is an accomplished motivational speaker and has been instrumental as a founding member of One Mile Closer in Europe and Korea.

@jameshooper 

Dr. James Hooper FRGS

At the age of 15, James set his sights on climbing Mt. Everest. Shortly after his 19th birthday, he was gazing down from the summit at the world below him-his life of adventure was only beginning. After conquering Everest with Rob Gauntlett at the age of 19, the pair completed a journey from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the Magnetic South Pole, including a 5000-mile cycle ride from New York to Punta Arenas at the southern tip of Chile. In 2009, he moved to Korea to study geography at Kyunghee University and subsequently joined the popular panel-show “Non-summit”. James is an accomplished motivational speaker and has been instrumental as a founding member of One Mile Closer in Europe and Korea.

@jameshooper 

Dr. James Hooper FRGS

At the age of 15, James set his sights on climbing Mt. Everest. Shortly after his 19th birthday, he was gazing down from the summit at the world below him - his life of adventure was only beginning. After conquering Everest with Rob Gauntlett at the age of 19, the pair completed a journey from the Geomagnetic North Pole to the Magnetic South Pole - 180 Degrees around the planet, through the Americas and across the Southern Ocean.

After the passing of Rob Gauntlett and James Atkinson, he moved to Korea to study geography at Kyunghee University and subsequently joined the popular panel-show ”Non-summit.”

Since the start of One Mile Closer, James has combined his skills as an adventurer with his position as a celebrity to lead, develop and nurture the team. Without him, we would certainly have lost our way

@jameshooper 

Richard Lebon

Richard graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in Geography, before developing an overseas career as a civil engineer and project manager in locations such as DRC, Pakistan, Haiti, Kenya, and Qatar. Using this experience, Richard continues to work closely with the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund(HVSMF) to deliver school projects in Uganda.

Alongside his own cross-continental cycling trips, he played a critical role in supporting Rob and James’ adventures-contributing his logistical and managerial expertise to both the Everest and 180 Degrees expeditions, and he now runs a small cycle-touring business.

With a leading role in organizing the European riders since 2009, Richard has been a driving force behind the development of One Mile Closer

@veloceneadventures

Richard Lebon

Richard graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in Geography, before developing an overseas career as a civil engineer and project manager in locations such as DRC, Pakistan, Haiti, Kenya, and Qatar. Using this experience, Richard continues to work closely with the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund(HVSMF) to deliver school projects in Uganda.

Alongside his own cross-continental cycling trips, he played a critical role in supporting Rob and James’ adventures-contributing his logistical and managerial expertise to both the Everest and 180 Degrees expeditions, and he now runs a small cycle-touring business.

With a leading role in organizing the European riders since 2009, Richard has been a driving force behind the development of One Mile Closer

@veloceneadventures

Richard Lebon FRGS MICE

Richard graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in Geography, before developing an overseas career as a civil engineer and project manager in locations such as DRC, Pakistan, Haiti, Kenya, and Qatar. Using this experience, Richard continues to work closely with the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund(HVSMF) to deliver school projects in Uganda.

Alongside his own cross-continental cycling trips, he played a critical role in supporting Rob and James’ adventures-contributing his logistical and managerial expertise to both the Everest and 180 Degrees expeditions, and he now runs a small cycle-touring business.

With a leading role in organizing the European riders since 2009, Richard has been a driving force behind the development of One Mile Closer

@veloceneadventures

Richard Lebon FRGS MICE

Richard graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in Geography, before developing an overseas career as a civil engineer and project manager in locations such as DRC, Pakistan, Haiti, Kenya, and Qatar. Using this experience, Richard continues to work closely with the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund(HVSMF) to deliver school projects in Uganda.

Alongside his own cross-continental cycling trips, he played a critical role in supporting Rob and James’ adventures-contributing his logistical and managerial expertise to both the Everest and 180 Degrees expeditions, and he now runs a small cycle-touring business.

With a leading role in organizing the European riders since 2009, Richard has been a driving force behind the development of One Mile Closer

@veloceneadventures

Richard Lebon FRGS MICE

Richard is a Chartered Civil Engineer and Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He currently runs a cycle touring business, organizing and guiding groups of cyclists around Europe and Asia. Richard graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in Geography, before developing a career as a logistician in which he managed aid projects on the ground in the DRC, Pakistan, and Haiti. He also worked with the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund (HVSMF) to deliver school projects in Uganda.

Alongside his own adventures and self-supported cross-continental cycling trips, he played a critical role in supporting Rob and James’ adventures – contributing his logistical and managerial expertise to both the Everest and 180 Degrees expeditions.

Since the first ride in 2009, Richard has been a driving force behind the development of One Mile Closer - taking a leading role in organizing the European rides.

@veloceneadventures

Richard Lebon
Tim

Tim Gauntlett

Tim is Rob’s younger brother and the pair began climbing and cycling together from a young age. Like his older brother, Tim would regularly challenge himself at a young age, cycling the 1000 miles from Lan’s End to John O’Groats at the age of 14, and rock climbing challenging multi-pitch routes on crags in the UK and Europe. Tim is an enthusiastic linguist, with a deep passion for science, and an enjoyment of working with digital technology. Tim first came to Korea to stay with James in 2012, and following multiple visits, he moved to Seoul in 2017 to study the Korea language. Tim is one of the founding members of One Mile Closer, helping to organize and lead all the rides in Europe and Korea.

@timmy_arirang

Tim Gauntlett

Tim is Rob’s younger brother and the pair began climbing and cycling together from a young age. Like his older brother, Tim would regularly challenge himself at a young age, cycling the 1000 miles from Lan’s End to John O’Groats at the age of 14, and rock climbing challenging multi-pitch routes on crags in the UK and Europe. Tim is an enthusiastic linguist, with a deep passion for science, and an enjoyment of working with digital technology. Tim first came to Korea to stay with James in 2012, and following multiple visits, he moved to Seoul in 2017 to study the Korea language. Tim is one of the founding members of One Mile Closer, helping to organize and lead all the rides in Europe and Korea.

@timmy_arirang

Tim Gauntlett

Tim is Rob’s younger brother and the pair began climbing and cycling together from a young age. Like his older brother, Tim would regularly challenge himself at a young age, cycling the 1000 miles from Lan’s End to John O’Groats at the age of 14, and rock climbing challenging multi-pitch routes on crags in the UK and Europe. Tim is an enthusiastic linguist, with a deep passion for science, and an enjoyment of working with digital technology. Tim first came to Korea to stay with James in 2012, and following multiple visits, he moved to Seoul in 2017 to study the Korea language. Tim is one of the founding members of One Mile Closer, helping to organize and lead all the rides in Europe and Korea.

@timmy_arirang

Tim Gauntlett

Tim is Rob’s younger brother and the pair began climbing and cycling together from a young age. Like his older brother, Tim would regularly challenge himself at a young age, cycling the 1000 miles from Lan’s End to John O’Groats at the age of 14, and rock climbing challenging multi-pitch routes on crags in the UK and Europe. Tim is an enthusiastic linguist, with a deep passion for science, and an enjoyment of working with digital technology. Tim first came to Korea to stay with James in 2012, and following multiple visits, he moved to Seoul in 2017 to study the Korea language. Tim is one of the founding members of One Mile Closer, helping to organize and lead all the rides in Europe and Korea.

@timmy_arirang

Tim Gauntlett

Tim is Rob’s younger brother and the pair began climbing and cycling together from a young age. Tim would regularly match or better his older brother’s feats, cycling the 1000 miles from Land’s End to John O’Groats at the age of 14, and rock climbing challenging multi-pitch routes on crags in the UK and Europe. Tim is an enthusiastic linguist, harbours a deep passion for science, and has a talent for working with digital technology. He is a tech entrepreneur, who has developed and managed numerous apps and web companies. Tim first came to Korea to stay with James in 2012, and following multiple visits, he moved to Seoul permanently in 2017 to study the Korean language. Tim is one of the founding members of One Mile Closer, helping to organize and lead every ride in both Europe and Korea.

@timmy_arirang

Sean Park

Sean loves the mountains and the sea and enjoys surfing, biking, and trail running. And he always longs for adventure. 

Attending an invitation from friend James, participating in the European OMC in 2012 became a turning point in his life, and Sean brought OMC to Korea for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has been leading the Korean campaign, spreading the joy of adventure and donation to more people. Through OMC, he becomes friends with an adventurer named Rob, who is now not with us, and says he learned that someone's small donations and good deeds can be miracles on the other side of the globe. 

Sean dreams of continuing to support children in Nalango, Uganda, and young sports dreamers in Korea. He also wants to expand the OMC spirit to deliver the joy of adventure and donation to growing children through adventure education. Inspired by John, who was a wonderful helper in the Pole-to-pole adventure and ran 2,000 kilometers from Rome to London in 50 days, Sean had tried 420 kilometers from Busan to Seoul.

@sean_the_cyclist

Sean Park

Sean loves the mountains and the sea and enjoys surfing, biking, and trail running. And he always longs for adventure. 

Attending an invitation from friend James, participating in the European OMC in 2012 became a turning point in his life, and Sean brought OMC to Korea for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has been leading the Korean campaign, spreading the joy of adventure and donation to more people. Through OMC, he becomes friends with an adventurer named Rob, who is now not with us, and says he learned that someone's small donations and good deeds can be miracles on the other side of the globe. 

Sean dreams of continuing to support children in Nalango, Uganda, and young sports dreamers in Korea. He also wants to expand the OMC spirit to deliver the joy of adventure and donation to growing children through adventure education. Inspired by John, who was a wonderful helper in the Pole-to-pole adventure and ran 2,000 kilometers from Rome to London in 50 days, Sean had tried 420 kilometers from Busan to Seoul.

@sean_the_cyclist

Sean Park

Sean loves the mountains and the sea and enjoys surfing, biking, and trail running. And he always longs for adventure. 

Attending an invitation from friend James, participating in the European OMC in 2012 became a turning point in his life, and Sean brought OMC to Korea for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has been leading the Korean campaign, spreading the joy of adventure and donation to more people. Through OMC, he becomes friends with an adventurer named Rob, who is now not with us, and says he learned that someone's small donations and good deeds can be miracles on the other side of the globe. 

Sean dreams of continuing to support children in Nalango, Uganda, and young sports dreamers in Korea. He also wants to expand the OMC spirit to deliver the joy of adventure and donation to growing children through adventure education. Inspired by John, who was a wonderful helper in the Pole-to-pole adventure and ran 2,000 kilometers from Rome to London in 50 days, Sean had tried 420 kilometers from Busan to Seoul.

@sean_the_cyclist

Sean Park

Sean loves the mountains and the sea and enjoys surfing, biking, and trail running. And he always longs for adventure. 

Attending an invitation from friend James, participating in the European OMC in 2012 became a turning point in his life, and Sean brought OMC to Korea for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has been leading the Korean campaign, spreading the joy of adventure and donation to more people. Through OMC, he becomes friends with an adventurer named Rob, who is now not with us, and says he learned that someone's small donations and good deeds can be miracles on the other side of the globe. 

Sean dreams of continuing to support children in Nalango, Uganda, and young sports dreamers in Korea. He also wants to expand the OMC spirit to deliver the joy of adventure and donation to growing children through adventure education. Inspired by John, who was a wonderful helper in the Pole-to-pole adventure and ran 2,000 kilometers from Rome to London in 50 days, Sean had tried 420 kilometers from Busan to Seoul.

@sean_the_cyclist

Sean Park

Sean loves the mountains and the sea and enjoys surfing, biking, and trail running. And he always longs for adventure. 

Attending an invitation from friend James, participating in the European OMC in 2012 became a turning point in his life, and Sean brought OMC to Korea for the first time in 2015. Since then, he has been leading the Korean campaign, spreading the joy of adventure and donation to more people. Through OMC, he becomes friends with an adventurer named Rob, who is now not with us, and says he learned that someone's small donations and good deeds can be miracles on the other side of the globe. 

Sean dreams of continuing to support children in Nalango, Uganda, and young sports dreamers in Korea. He also wants to expand the OMC spirit to deliver the joy of adventure and donation to growing children through adventure education. Inspired by John, who was a wonderful helper in the Pole-to-pole adventure and ran 2,000 kilometers from Rome to London in 50 days, Sean had tried 420 kilometers from Busan to Seoul.

@sean_the_cyclist

sean
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One Mile Closer was set up in memory Rob Gauntlett and James Atkinson. The boys wished that all young people would be able to have the same opportunities that they had benefited from themselves - OMC raises money to that end.

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